contact lenses, blurry contacts, inserting contacts

Can You Relate To Blurriness? 

You wake up in the morning, put your contacts in, and look out across the room only to see blurriness. You add eye drops, hoping they will feel better, and it clears up, but it doesn’t. You are just plain miserable. Sadly, you rip them out and put on your glasses.  

 

What’s the Problem?

Dirty contact lenses are likely the culprit of your contact lens discomfort! Be aware of these three common problem areas: 

1.     When you take that first blink in the morning, your eyelids spread yesterday’s debris and makeup over your eye to cause a “film” or haze. 

2.     Your eyelashes trap dirt every day. Eyelashes protect your eye from microscopic dirt and debris. However, the lid margin next to your eyelashes spreads that dirt and debris with each blink, if you don’t use proper hygiene.

3.     Confirm what type of contact lenses you have. Don’t make the mistake of sleeping in contacts that aren’t designed for it.

 

Soap Made for Eyelids and Lashes

We often learn not to put soap in or around your eyes. Today, we recommend you use a foam soap with lots of delicate bubbles that are specifically formulated to cleanse your eyelids and lashes. Use it during your morning shower to clean out the sticky gunk in the corners of your eyes. That sticky stuff is yesterday’s debris. Use it at night to minimize morning stickiness the following day. 

 

Hand Soap for Contact Lenses

Most hand soaps have moisturizers as an ingredient, and your hands by design have oils in the skin. When you insert your contacts, oils from your finger can transfer to your contact lens in the form of a fingerprint firmly planted on the outside of your lens. We recommend you use  OCuSoft Hand Soap, a product specially formulated to conquer this problem.

 

Clean Your Lenses

Use the manufacture’s recommended product for cleaning your lenses. Don’t put them in your bacteria-laden mouth — you will transfer bacteria to your eyes, and could potentially cause an eye infection. If you want to get the most out of your lenses, don’t be cheap and buy the off-brand either, it’s not the same formula as the manufacturer. Get the best you can. Your eyes deserve it. 

 

Why does soap work?

Soap traps dirt. At the molecular level, soap is extremely destructive and breaks down the molecular structure. A drop of soap is enough to kill or trap many types of bacteria and viruses, including the new COVID-19. The secret to soap’s impressive ability to destroy bacteria is in the bubbles! 

 

Molecules, when suspended in water, float about as separate units, then interact with other molecules in the solution and finally assemble themselves into little bubbles called micelles, which wash away with water. The bottom line is that soap molecules disrupt the chemical bonds that allow bacteria, viruses, and grime to stick to surfaces like eyelids and lashes. Once you break the molecular bonds, soap can easily lift the offensive bacteria, viruses, or makeup off the skin.

 

Summary:

1.     Remove and Clean Contact Lenses

Don’t sleep in daily contacts. Remove them and clean them. 

 

2.     Discontinue use of expired contacts

Don’t wear contacts past the expiration date. They are no longer are safe to wear because the dirt, debris, and oils have built up making lenses no longer comfortable. To avoid eye infection, toss them out. 

 

3.     Clean Your Fingers

Use Contact Lens Hand Soap designed for removing the oils from your fingers while handling contacts.  

 

4.     Wash eyelids and lashes

Use specially designed soap to cleanse eyelids and lashes.

 

5.     Create a routine and stick to it

Put the lid scrub in the shower. Then ensure your hand soap and lenses cleaner are where you handle contacts. Remember, it takes about 21 days to make it a habit.

 

Soap is so simple and amazing! Use of the right kinds of soap resolves contact lens discomforts and makes contacts easy to wear and enjoy. Follow the hygiene tips listed above to create a lasting routine to ensure you avoid eye issues and extra trips to the eye doctor.  

 

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